allowing ephemerality

came for the baby animal gifs, stayed for the social justice. blogging about library science type things at Archivistic


Ask me  
Reblogged from stealyourhearttt
Reblogged from libraryjournal
Reblogged from itsawomansworld2

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

Even when I was explicitly trying, I still failed to have the discussion participants fairly represent the population of the students in my classroom.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it’s called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are ‘hogging the floor’ even when men are dominating.

Stop interrupting me: gender, conversation dominance and listener bias, by Jessica Kirkpatrick from Women In Astronomy

Implicit bias is a thing, just like privilege. Calling it out isn’t meant to shame anyone, but to alert us to step it up and improve ourselves so everyone can have a voice. Be conscious of what you and others are saying, and know when not to speak.

(via scientific-women)

(Source: itsawomansworld2, via thefeministpress)

Reblogged from notthatkindoftour
Reblogged from mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

mypubliclands:

What does Jurassic Park have to do with public lands? Quite a bit, actually…

Jurassic Park is based on paleontologist’s research analyzing fossils. Our extensive knowledge of dinosaurs wouldn’t be possible without this research, which is conducted by permitted paleontologists and their students. Many of the greatest dinosaur discoveries occur on your public lands in Alaska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana and New Mexico!  For example, just outside Cañon City, Colorado discoveries include the first complete skeleton of Allosaurus, the three most complete Stegosaurus skeletons ever found, as well as the first known remains of dinosaurs like Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus, and Diplodocus.

Of course, the proper preservation and protection of paleontological resources is a vital component of BLM’s Paleontology program and is the reason that the BLM and Universal Studios created these Public Service Announcements back in 1993.  Students and scientists with BLM permits are making new discoveries every year, many of whom became excited about paleontology because of movies such as Jurassic Park. Join the adventure, click here to learn more about fossils on public lands!

—Kyle Sullivan, BLM Colorado

Watch the original PSAs here:

Jeff Goldblum

Laura Dern

Sam Neill

Michael Crichton

Note: license for footage used in these PSAs granted by Universal Studios in June 1993.

Happy National Fossil Day 2014, Tumblrs!  Celebrate with our dino throwback.

This is amazing.